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Archive for the ‘Burlap’ Category


Prepare for Flood, Debris, and Erosion with Burlap Matting and Sandbags


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This year has already seen some heavy and sustained storms in many areas causing millions in property damage. It happens annually in cycles that are largely predictable, but sometimes the extent of the potential damage is not. Storm paths can deviate and the strength of storms vary as they travel.

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Burlap for Enrichment


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Enrichment is a term we use for something that enhances the quality of our lives. Can something as simple as burlap make our lives better by producing opportunities to create, solve problems, or feel enthusiasm and happiness? A fabric with texture gives a unique feel and look that can inspire art, the natural durability makes it functional and abundant in our environment, the myriad of uses gives us the unlimited potential for invention. Often, we learn about ourselves while studying other animals and zoological parks have been using burlap for the daily enrichment of different animal species for years.

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Looking Forward to Using Burlap in the Fall


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Plant fiber products like burlap come in handy for every season and, between yard work and holiday decorations, the fall is no exception.

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The History of Jute


Posted in Arts and Crafts, Burlap, Grain and Feed Bags, Industrial Packaging, Jute, Nursery Supplies, Sandbags | No Comments »

The heart of the Jute trade is in Bangladesh and West Bengal, due to its naturally fertile soil. In the mid-1500s to early 1600s, the poor rural people of India handmade their jutjutee clothing, rope, twine, and macramé hangers. Chinese papermakers selected plants like hemp, silk, jute, and cotton for papermaking. Flax and hemp were preferred in the spinning industries in Europe and America until jute was taken to Europe by the Dutch and Fre nch and then on to Britain by the East India Company.

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Finding Recycled Jute, Burlap, or Sisal Bags for Home and Commercial Use


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Jute plant fibers are largely used to make burlap material and sisal is another common term for plant fiber based fabric. It can be bought new, but is often reused because of its natural durability. Using recycled material always makes sense, but sometimes it is difficult to locate a place to buy them. In the case of recycled jute, burlap, or sisal bags like those used for coffee, peanuts, and other agricultural products, it doesn’t have to be.

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Burlap: Practical and Decorative Uses Outdoors


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As the hot summer months begin, thoughts turn to the yard and garden.  Burlap really comes in handy for mid-summer heat. It has practical uses in the garden and decorative uses in outdoor living spaces.

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Burlap and Canvas Shade Screens for the Summer


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The applications of shade screen fabrics like jute and cotton based canvas and burlap are endless. Shade mesh is commonly used in agricultural and home garden settings to protect plants from over-exposure to the sun while allowing rain to seep through. It provides sun, shade, and wind protection.

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Gardening with Burlap


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gardenIf you are a fan of a natural looking garden, take a look at burlap for inspiration to recreate your surroundings outdoors. When you purchase plants, trees and shrubs from stores, their root balls are protected with burlap for a very good reason. The burlap will biodegrade over time so you don’t need to remove it when planting; roots will grow right through it, worms will devour it along with other nutrients in the ground, and eventually it will disappear.

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Clothing is Made from Plants Including Jute!


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Posted in Agricultural Packaging, Arts and Crafts, Burlap, Flood Protection, Nursery Horticulture, Nursery Supplies | No Comments »

We purchase clothing all the time, often without checking to see what the material is made from. There are fabrics we find instantly identifiable while others are not as familiar. Many of our fabrics are made from plant fibers. Those fibers are blended with others for certain characteristics like durability, comfort, and the ease with which they can be dyed for color options. Some fabrics previously not chosen for clothing are being considered for blends especially since new technologies have been able to make them more workable.

Burlap is made from plant fibers like jute or hemp. Burlap is a very coarse fabric, but there have been efforts over the years to use it for making inexpensive clothing with various results. Knitting_wales_slip_stitchJute fiber is used to make Ghillie suits for military camouflage that resembles grasses or brush. While it is still considered uncomfortable on its own, jute can be blended with cotton and other fabrics to make espadrilles, soft sweaters, and cardigans.

Pure hemp has a similar feel to linen. Hemp was used extensively by the United States during World War II to make uniforms because it tends to be strong, insulating, absorbent, and durable. These are excellent qualities for garments that will see hard wear and tear. The fibers can last up to three times longer than cotton fibers. Advances in breeding and treating hemp can create much finer, softer fabrics and it is also able to blend with flax, cotton or silk.

Hemp jewelry is the product of knotting hemp twine called macramé. Hemp jewelry includes bracelets, necklaces, anklets, rings, and even watches. jute jewelleryWhile this isn’t clothing, it is definitely wearable as well as creative.
Consumers are far more likely to use basic burlap material for tablecloths, throw rugs or other applications like decorative tapestries, pillows, or lampshades in homes with a rustic charm.

Linen fabric is made from the flax plant. Clothing made from it is usually comfortable and designed for a generous flowing fit. Flax was first used in the Mediterranean to make string and then finer strands made comfortable tunics to wear when it was warm. It was covered up by wool when it became cold. Linen became considered an undergarment and was hard to dye so it was mainly worn in white. There are many types of clothing made with flax today including skirts, dresses, blouses, shirts, pants, and jackets.

Other natural plant fabrics that can be used for clothing include Cotton and Ramie. Cotton is still the most widely used natural fiber in the global textile industry because it is naturally soft and easy to dye, but Jute production comes in second because of its variety of uses. Ramie is silky in texture and one of the strongest natural fibers, but Hemp is the strongest. All of these plants can be spun into a thread or rope and woven, knit, matted, or bound.

Get curious and read the label next time you go shopping!

Jute is a Natural Product with a Variety of ‘Green’ Uses


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Posted in Agricultural Packaging, Burlap, Flood Protection, Industrial Packaging, Nursery Horticulture, Nursery Supplies, NYP-Corp News, Sandbags | No Comments »

In an age of technology, we sometimes learn that simpler, natural products are better. In the case of Jute, we have not successfully duplicated a synthetic fiber that is as environmentally friendly as the one nature made.

Burlap Bags

Jute is a vegetable fiber that can be woven into a coarse fabric commonly known as burlap. Jute is not the only plant fiber that is used to make burlap. Hemp and Flax fibers work as well.

For many centuries, jute has been used to create packaging materials such as cloth for sacks, rope, yarn, carpet backing, and other woven goods. It is inexpensive to produce and has added insulation, low thermal conductivity, and anti-static features.

The construction industry looked for a replacement because of its tendency to become yellow, brittle, and break down when exposed to sunlight, water, and humidity, but it came at a price.

 

Synthetic Replacements for Jute

Linoleum was the precursor to vinyl flooring, came in rolls, and required a backing when installed just like carpet. It was made of linseed and wood materials, then backed by canvas or burlap fabric. Unlike carpet and wood flooring, it was water resistant and easy to clean. It was even popular on battleships and commercial buildings because of its strength and stability.

Jute_cane
Synthetic materials mostly made out of PVC or plastic have replaced jute in many residential and commercial construction applications because they are even less costly to create and more efficient to use. Over the years, many of these synthetics products have proved to be toxic and environmentally unfriendly. Carpeting, vinyl, and insulating materials now contain rubber, PVC, and recycled petroleum products. These materials are not biodegradable and release chemicals into homes that can cause cancer.

 

Thinking Green

Today, “thinking green” has the building industry suggesting a return to the original, less toxic flooring using plant fibers again. Industrial uses for jute and burlap are being used in ceiling tile (composite insulation), filtration, reinforcement materials and hardboards, carpets, and upholstery. The engineering and automotive industries are using technical textiles for insulation, isolation, and reinforcement. Technical and geotextiles are made of jute, coconut raw material, and other fleece materials made of special fiber types put through specific processing techniques to create flexible, high moisture absorption fabrics.

 

Wood Products

Jute is being considered a possible alternative to wood. Its stem contains a wood-like center core. Taking no more than six months to grow to maturity, it can be harvested faster than trees. It could be used as an alternative source for making paper, rather than cutting down trees for pulp.

Products made of jute like fabrics, residential textiles, composite building materials, geotextiles, pulps, technical textiles, handicraft materials, and fashion accessories are more competitive against oil derivative counterparts than they once were. Features of jute that cause it to slowly fade and break down in the environment are welcome and in some industries, like agriculture and landscaping, precisely why we use it.