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Archive for the ‘Nursery Supplies’ Category


Using Burlap or Polypropylene Tarps for Landscaping Debris


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blog1-1Many landscapers have learned the best way to clean-up debris from lawn and flower bed maintenance is having a few tarps on hand. Large jobs can generate loads of grass clippings, trimmings, and leaves in the fall. Hauling the debris means getting it to the truck or trailer. Being quick and efficient allows them to do more jobs in less time.

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The History of Jute


Posted in Arts and Crafts, Burlap, Grain and Feed Bags, Industrial Packaging, Jute, Nursery Supplies, Sandbags | No Comments »

The heart of the Jute trade is in Bangladesh and West Bengal, due to its naturally fertile soil. In the mid-1500s to early 1600s, the poor rural people of India handmade their jutjutee clothing, rope, twine, and macramé hangers. Chinese papermakers selected plants like hemp, silk, jute, and cotton for papermaking. Flax and hemp were preferred in the spinning industries in Europe and America until jute was taken to Europe by the Dutch and Fre nch and then on to Britain by the East India Company.

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Gardening with Burlap


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gardenIf you are a fan of a natural looking garden, take a look at burlap for inspiration to recreate your surroundings outdoors. When you purchase plants, trees and shrubs from stores, their root balls are protected with burlap for a very good reason. The burlap will biodegrade over time so you don’t need to remove it when planting; roots will grow right through it, worms will devour it along with other nutrients in the ground, and eventually it will disappear.

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Clothing is Made from Plants Including Jute!


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Posted in Agricultural Packaging, Arts and Crafts, Burlap, Flood Protection, Nursery Horticulture, Nursery Supplies | No Comments »

We purchase clothing all the time, often without checking to see what the material is made from. There are fabrics we find instantly identifiable while others are not as familiar. Many of our fabrics are made from plant fibers. Those fibers are blended with others for certain characteristics like durability, comfort, and the ease with which they can be dyed for color options. Some fabrics previously not chosen for clothing are being considered for blends especially since new technologies have been able to make them more workable.

Burlap is made from plant fibers like jute or hemp. Burlap is a very coarse fabric, but there have been efforts over the years to use it for making inexpensive clothing with various results. Knitting_wales_slip_stitchJute fiber is used to make Ghillie suits for military camouflage that resembles grasses or brush. While it is still considered uncomfortable on its own, jute can be blended with cotton and other fabrics to make espadrilles, soft sweaters, and cardigans.

Pure hemp has a similar feel to linen. Hemp was used extensively by the United States during World War II to make uniforms because it tends to be strong, insulating, absorbent, and durable. These are excellent qualities for garments that will see hard wear and tear. The fibers can last up to three times longer than cotton fibers. Advances in breeding and treating hemp can create much finer, softer fabrics and it is also able to blend with flax, cotton or silk.

Hemp jewelry is the product of knotting hemp twine called macramé. Hemp jewelry includes bracelets, necklaces, anklets, rings, and even watches. jute jewelleryWhile this isn’t clothing, it is definitely wearable as well as creative.
Consumers are far more likely to use basic burlap material for tablecloths, throw rugs or other applications like decorative tapestries, pillows, or lampshades in homes with a rustic charm.

Linen fabric is made from the flax plant. Clothing made from it is usually comfortable and designed for a generous flowing fit. Flax was first used in the Mediterranean to make string and then finer strands made comfortable tunics to wear when it was warm. It was covered up by wool when it became cold. Linen became considered an undergarment and was hard to dye so it was mainly worn in white. There are many types of clothing made with flax today including skirts, dresses, blouses, shirts, pants, and jackets.

Other natural plant fabrics that can be used for clothing include Cotton and Ramie. Cotton is still the most widely used natural fiber in the global textile industry because it is naturally soft and easy to dye, but Jute production comes in second because of its variety of uses. Ramie is silky in texture and one of the strongest natural fibers, but Hemp is the strongest. All of these plants can be spun into a thread or rope and woven, knit, matted, or bound.

Get curious and read the label next time you go shopping!

Jute is a Natural Product with a Variety of ‘Green’ Uses


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Posted in Agricultural Packaging, Burlap, Flood Protection, Industrial Packaging, Nursery Horticulture, Nursery Supplies, NYP-Corp News, Sandbags | No Comments »

In an age of technology, we sometimes learn that simpler, natural products are better. In the case of Jute, we have not successfully duplicated a synthetic fiber that is as environmentally friendly as the one nature made.

Burlap Bags

Jute is a vegetable fiber that can be woven into a coarse fabric commonly known as burlap. Jute is not the only plant fiber that is used to make burlap. Hemp and Flax fibers work as well.

For many centuries, jute has been used to create packaging materials such as cloth for sacks, rope, yarn, carpet backing, and other woven goods. It is inexpensive to produce and has added insulation, low thermal conductivity, and anti-static features.

The construction industry looked for a replacement because of its tendency to become yellow, brittle, and break down when exposed to sunlight, water, and humidity, but it came at a price.

 

Synthetic Replacements for Jute

Linoleum was the precursor to vinyl flooring, came in rolls, and required a backing when installed just like carpet. It was made of linseed and wood materials, then backed by canvas or burlap fabric. Unlike carpet and wood flooring, it was water resistant and easy to clean. It was even popular on battleships and commercial buildings because of its strength and stability.

Jute_cane
Synthetic materials mostly made out of PVC or plastic have replaced jute in many residential and commercial construction applications because they are even less costly to create and more efficient to use. Over the years, many of these synthetics products have proved to be toxic and environmentally unfriendly. Carpeting, vinyl, and insulating materials now contain rubber, PVC, and recycled petroleum products. These materials are not biodegradable and release chemicals into homes that can cause cancer.

 

Thinking Green

Today, “thinking green” has the building industry suggesting a return to the original, less toxic flooring using plant fibers again. Industrial uses for jute and burlap are being used in ceiling tile (composite insulation), filtration, reinforcement materials and hardboards, carpets, and upholstery. The engineering and automotive industries are using technical textiles for insulation, isolation, and reinforcement. Technical and geotextiles are made of jute, coconut raw material, and other fleece materials made of special fiber types put through specific processing techniques to create flexible, high moisture absorption fabrics.

 

Wood Products

Jute is being considered a possible alternative to wood. Its stem contains a wood-like center core. Taking no more than six months to grow to maturity, it can be harvested faster than trees. It could be used as an alternative source for making paper, rather than cutting down trees for pulp.

Products made of jute like fabrics, residential textiles, composite building materials, geotextiles, pulps, technical textiles, handicraft materials, and fashion accessories are more competitive against oil derivative counterparts than they once were. Features of jute that cause it to slowly fade and break down in the environment are welcome and in some industries, like agriculture and landscaping, precisely why we use it.

Innovative, New Jute and Fiber Products Rediscovered


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Posted in Agricultural Packaging, Burlap, Citrus Produce Bags, Flood Protection, Grain and Feed Bags, Industrial Packaging, Military Sandbags, Nursery Horticulture, Nursery Supplies, NYP-Corp News, Sandbags | No Comments »

 

Quick History

For many centuries, jute has been traditionally used for the manufacturing of woven fabrics, ropes, nets, and yarns in order to package other materials. Hessian fabric, also known as burlap in the US and Canada is made from the skin of jute plants or sisal fibers and other vegetable fibers.burlap

It originated in India for rope and paper production, then the English brought it to Britain and the Scottish made it into yarn. Bangladesh and India are the world’s largest producers of Burlap today with close competition from China, Myanmar, Brazil, and Thailand.

Jute is largely grown in the Ganges delta where climates are warm and humid and there are 2-3 inches of rainfall per week. Two varieties include plants related to hibiscus and cotton. The outer stem of the plant goes through a process called retting where they are soaked and broken down into workable fibers. The fibers are woven into dense fabrics that are strong, flexible, biodegradable, and extensively recycled due to their various uses.

For a long time, the use of jute and other fiber products were declining due to new synthetic technologies, but recently there has been a surge to return to these products for new innovative and environmentally conscious reasons.

Natural Fabrics

Geotextiles and technical textiles are made of jute matting, coconut coir, straw, and wood fiber materials that absorb moisture, maintain flexibility and drain well. This makes them perfect for agricultural, structural, and civil engineering.

Burlap Weaving

Highway Construction

When large quantities of the earth are moved it creates bare slopes and hillsides that easily erode. Temporary protective barriers made with plant fibers are installed to stop erosion while still allowing vegetation to grow for a more permanent solution of grass, plants, trees and rocks.

Environmental Emergencies

When it comes to natural disasters like landslides, floods and fires, sandbags are used to protect against moving soil, water, and extinguishing chemicals, then naturally disintegrate over time. They are inexpensive enough for use in developing countries.

Other Uses

Some other uses of raw fiber like jute are used for composites, insulation, soil layer separation, pond construction, rope to secure trees, camouflage nets, and shading.

Not all geotextiles are made of natural products so be sure to ask when looking for supplies. There are three types:

        • Non-woven for drainage, stabilization, and filtering
        • Woven for road construction, under rip rap, for heavy erosion on embankments and steep slopes
        • Coir for sediment control and bio-engineering in short-term applications.

Whether you are preparing for a major commercial project or doing some landscaping at home, burlap and other jute matting and materials are durable and versatile products that get the job done without harming the environment or requiring removal when you are done. The long history of plant fiber products and their clever and practical uses has been rediscovered.

NYP Corp Provides Wholesale Nursery Supplies


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NYP CorpNYP Corp leader in Wholesale Nursery Supplies provides quality wholesale products for all your nursery needs. They have been supplying superior nursery products since 1946 and know what it takes to make your business profitable.

They are a wholesale manufacture company that offers the best products available in large discounts from their six locations.

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Nursery Supplies – Wire Baskets


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Nursery Supplies - Wire BasketsTree roots need protection until the tree is planted. The balled and burlap method avoids most root damage. The method holds the roots and soil in place and makes transplanting easier.

The technique improved over the past decade. Tree roots balled and burlapped, with biodegradable, no-rot burlap, are now placed in a wire basket. The baskets do little or no harm to a tree and are planted right along with the roots. NYP Corp delivers exceptional and affordable wire baskets to nurserymen.

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Preparing Your Garden for Spring


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Protect your Garden from Weeds Using Ground Covers and BurlapThe planting season is here, and it’s time to get your garden ready for Spring. Maintaining a healthy garden requires hard work from start to finish, but there are a few ways you can reduce the usual problems associated with caring for a home garden. NYP Corp provides wholesale nursery supplies from six locations including landscape supplies, burlap and other supplies to meet the needs of gardeners.

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Shade Cloth for a Vegetable Garden


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NYP Corp Shade Cloth Protect GardensHot summer sun can be brutal on a tender vegetable garden. Plants and vegetables can literally become sunburned and soils dry out. To protect plants and vegetables from the damaging effects of the sun, wise gardeners use shade cloth. NYP Corp has six locations in the U.S. offering wholesale nursery supplies, including lock-stitched knitted shade cloth that remain intact after trimming to a desired size, no wrinkles during installation, and will not ravel or fray.

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